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Thread: KVM or Xen

  1. #1
    Registered User Array

    Cool KVM or Xen

    Hello to everyone, what better KVM or XEN ? And why you think so ?

  2. #2
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    Citrix Xenserver, because I prefer the command line for it

  3. #3
    Registered User Array
    The choice to choose KVM or XEN is as likely to be decided by your vendors. As they both are open source and supported by large communities.

    XEN tends to be more stable. It is older and more mature. It also offers near-native drivers for OSs like Microsoft Windows. When coming to KVM, it is weaker in those regards. However, KVM does very well when you compare Linux vs Linux against XEN.

  4. #4
    Registered User Array
    When comparing Xen to KVM for open source virtualization, Xen wins out for six compelling reasons: Better resources, platform support, manageability, implementation, live migration and performance benchmarks.


    Resources: Xen has been in the public domain for four years longer than KVM (2003 vs. 2007). With implementations from Citrix, Novell, Oracle, Sun, Red Hat and Virtual Iron, it is easier to find IT professionals with Xen skills, easier for those professionals to get Xen training, easier to locate Xen consultants and obtain Xen certification. These are critical issues for 60% of enterprises who say they lack essential virtualization resources and skills, according to research from a 2008 report on virtualization and management trends by Enterprise Management Associates (EMA).

    Platform Support: Xen currently supports more host and guest environments, including paravirtualized, hardware assisted and both modified and unmodified guests; UNIX, Linux and explicit support from Microsoft for Windows; multiple chipsets including x86, IA64, and ARM from AMD, Fujitsu, IBM, Sun and embedded support from x86/64 CPU vendor, Intel.

    Manageability: For 83% of all enterprises, says 2009 research on virtual systems management from EMA, management is a critical or important factor in choosing virtualization technology. In the comparing Xen vs. KVM comparison, Xen has a much broader third-party ecosystem for provisioning, backup, storage management, P2V, capacity planning, performance monitoring, process automation, security and other management disciplines from Citrix, IBM, CA, Novell/Platespin, Enomaly, Microsoft, HP, Quest/Vizioncore, Sun, Oracle, Symantec -- and even VMware (via Hyperic). Even Red Hat has no sophisticated tools available for KVM today, and its promised KVM management will lag for the foreseeable future.

    Implementation: Whether KVM is 'type 1' or 'type 2' is mostly semantic. Xen is run and managed at a lower level (ring 0), even for new virtual machine creation, and guests do not share memory blocks, CPU instructions or any of the underlying (albeit occasionally de-privileged) Linux operating system like KVM does. This means KVM suffers performance, latency, security, scalability, isolation and other issues that do not affect a true bare-metal hypervisor like Xen.

    No live migration with KVM: Most of the arguments used in the past to show VMware ESX superiority over Microsoft Hyper-V, also apply to Xen in comparison to KVM today. But this is the big one. Unlike KVM, Xen supports uninterrupted live migration to allow dynamic workload balancing and routine maintenance with near-zero downtime. KVM comes with an inherent downtime penalty.

    Performance: Most Xen vs. KVM performance benchmarks show Xen has better (near-native) processing performance, and only marginally underperforms KVM in disk I/O. Moreover, independent tests have shown that KVM performance suffers as more workloads are added, and it consistently crashed trying to support any more than four guests. Xen supported a linear increase to over 30 concurrent workloads.

    A more comprehensive Xen-KVM comparison would also show that Xen outperforms KVM with virtual network support, virtual storage support, enhanced security, high availability, fault tolerance, power management, HPC/real-time support, virtual CPU scalability, cross-vendor compatibility, VM portability, virtual appliance marketplace and an established cloud services ecosystem. So while KVM is technologically impressive and has some excellent use cases, it is still far-inferior to Xen as an enterprise-class server virtualization technology.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by okayservers1 View Post
    When comparing Xen to KVM for open source virtualization, Xen wins out for six compelling reasons: Better resources, platform support, manageability, implementation, live migration and performance benchmarks.


    Resources: Xen has been in the public domain for four years longer than KVM (2003 vs. 2007). With implementations from Citrix, Novell, Oracle, Sun, Red Hat and Virtual Iron, it is easier to find IT professionals with Xen skills, easier for those professionals to get Xen training, easier to locate Xen consultants and obtain Xen certification. These are critical issues for 60% of enterprises who say they lack essential virtualization resources and skills, according to research from a 2008 report on virtualization and management trends by Enterprise Management Associates (EMA).

    Platform Support: Xen currently supports more host and guest environments, including paravirtualized, hardware assisted and both modified and unmodified guests; UNIX, Linux and explicit support from Microsoft for Windows; multiple chipsets including x86, IA64, and ARM from AMD, Fujitsu, IBM, Sun and embedded support from x86/64 CPU vendor, Intel.

    Manageability: For 83% of all enterprises, says 2009 research on virtual systems management from EMA, management is a critical or important factor in choosing virtualization technology. In the comparing Xen vs. KVM comparison, Xen has a much broader third-party ecosystem for provisioning, backup, storage management, P2V, capacity planning, performance monitoring, process automation, security and other management disciplines from Citrix, IBM, CA, Novell/Platespin, Enomaly, Microsoft, HP, Quest/Vizioncore, Sun, Oracle, Symantec -- and even VMware (via Hyperic). Even Red Hat has no sophisticated tools available for KVM today, and its promised KVM management will lag for the foreseeable future.

    Implementation: Whether KVM is 'type 1' or 'type 2' is mostly semantic. Xen is run and managed at a lower level (ring 0), even for new virtual machine creation, and guests do not share memory blocks, CPU instructions or any of the underlying (albeit occasionally de-privileged) Linux operating system like KVM does. This means KVM suffers performance, latency, security, scalability, isolation and other issues that do not affect a true bare-metal hypervisor like Xen.

    No live migration with KVM: Most of the arguments used in the past to show VMware ESX superiority over Microsoft Hyper-V, also apply to Xen in comparison to KVM today. But this is the big one. Unlike KVM, Xen supports uninterrupted live migration to allow dynamic workload balancing and routine maintenance with near-zero downtime. KVM comes with an inherent downtime penalty.

    Performance: Most Xen vs. KVM performance benchmarks show Xen has better (near-native) processing performance, and only marginally underperforms KVM in disk I/O. Moreover, independent tests have shown that KVM performance suffers as more workloads are added, and it consistently crashed trying to support any more than four guests. Xen supported a linear increase to over 30 concurrent workloads.

    A more comprehensive Xen-KVM comparison would also show that Xen outperforms KVM with virtual network support, virtual storage support, enhanced security, high availability, fault tolerance, power management, HPC/real-time support, virtual CPU scalability, cross-vendor compatibility, VM portability, virtual appliance marketplace and an established cloud services ecosystem. So while KVM is technologically impressive and has some excellent use cases, it is still far-inferior to Xen as an enterprise-class server virtualization technology.
    Nice copy and paste job, shame that the resource that you blatantly plagiarised is horribly out of date...
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